My Approach

Originally trained at the Newark School of Violin Making, the foundations of my making are in the classical traditions of instrument making passed down and developed over centuries. I like to allow myself flexibility and freedom, and combine this with modern knowledge and techniques to enable me to further develop as a maker.

I am constantly working on designing instruments using the classical methods of harmonic design. Using knowledge which was highly developed in the renaissance period guides my work. Using this approach allows me to keep in the rooted traditions but still leaves me with endless possibilities to adjust and experiment depending on the desired result and create original pieces.

My research led me to reconstructing for myself an ongoing version of the Quadrivium, part of the ancient education system of the 7 liberal arts founded in ancient Greece around the 6th century and leading into the renaissance of the 12th century and the 14th-17th century.

The 4 parts of the Quadrivium were divided into: arithmetic (number), geometry (number in space), harmony (number in time), and astronomy (number in space and time).

My Instruments

Originally trained at the Newark School of Violin Making, the foundations of my making are in the classical traditions of instrument making passed down and developed over centuries. I like to allow myself flexibility and freedom, and combine this with modern knowledge and techniques to enable me to further develop as a maker.

I am constantly working on designing instruments using the classical methods of harmonic design. Using knowledge which was highly developed in the renaissance period guides my work. Using this approach allows me to keep in the rooted traditions but still leaves me with endless possibilities to adjust and experiment depending on the desired result and create original pieces.

My research led me to reconstructing for myself an ongoing version of the Quadrivium, part of the ancient education system of the 7 liberal arts founded in ancient Greece around the 6th century and leading into the renaissance of the 12th century and the 14th-17th century.

The 4 parts of the Quadrivium were divided into: arithmetic (number), geometry (number in space), harmony (number in time), and astronomy (number in space and time).

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